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Tea traditions around the world

As a favourite global past time, enjoying a cup of tea is often different all over the world. So much so, that some countries and cultures have treasured traditions, ceremonies and rituals in which teas are enjoyed.

  • Japan – The Matcha Ceremony. A type of green tea, Matcha is a celebrated staple. This ceremony involves the preparation and serving of Matcha to crowds of people in a traditional tree house.
  • Britain – The famous afternoon tea. Easily the most well-known of all global tea traditions, a spot of afternoon tea is the perfect excuse to have a cuppa and a baked treat like scones with jam and cream.
  • Russia – Zavarka. Fun fact: Russians love tea almost as much as they love vodka. They serve Zavarka, a very strong tea, to guests in many rounds.
  • Morocco – Mint Tea. Known as Touareg Tea, this Mint tea is given to guests as a symbol of hospitality. It is presented in glasses, three times to symbolise life, love and death. It is considered bad luck if you don’t drink them all!

Tea is not only a cup of happiness, but also a symbol of cultural identity!

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